Category Archives: Tips and Tools

Maritime Site Recording

I’m always interested in how data is recorded on different excavations, so a recent post on  Digital Archaeology Group caught my eye.  SiteRecorder is a PC based application for recording maritime archaeology using a GIS based approach.

The program has been designed for collecting data during fieldwork and creating site plans by combining detailed site drawings and survey data. Site Recorder can manage thousands of finds, photographs, survey data, dive logs, samples and documents – all the information relating to an underwater or intertidal site. Items can be associated with one another allowing quick and easy retrieval for analysis and interpretation.

I have no plans to learn to dive but I’m guessing that records aren’t made underwater using a PC, but this seems like an effective (and widely used) tool for recording shipwrecks and other underwater features.

Free demo and manuals are available here.

Worried about jargon?

There’s a fine line between using the right technical or academic terms in your writing and delivering prose that is so riddled with jargon as to be utterly incomprehensible.

If you’re worried you might have crossed the line there are some great jargon checkers around – such as this one from Instructional Solutions.

Also worth checking that you haven’t accidentally used someone else’s words – however perfect they are! Online plagiarism detectors include grammarly, bibme and quetext

 

LiDAR How-to Guide

I’m far from being a GIS expert, though starting to work through some ideas on exporting data from Archaeo-Pad into GIS, so it was very timely to see a post on a LiDAR to GIS tutorial posted on the BAJR facebook page by Jost Hobic.

Its a step by step tutorial on how to process data from a LiDAR pointcloud to DTM raster that is ready for visualization using free and open source GIS software.
https://arheologija.neocities.org/Lidar_tutorial.html

This tutorial was also published in Journal of Slovenian archaeological society.

Jost also maintains a list of free access LiDAR and DTM data https://arheologijaslovenija.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_81.ht…

Thanks to Jost Hobic for permission to re-post;

 

Abject plagiarism (Always have a backup plan)

Pottering around looking for useful archaeology related sites I happened across a post from CoDA titled “Always Have a backup Plan” and it put the case so simply and effectively I wanted to share it.

Its stating the blindingly obvious, but phones and tablets break, get dropped in puddles, decide to stop working for no apparent reason. So while they’re very useful and generally reliable you still need a backup.

As Nikki from CoDA says (I summarise);

Keep lots of backups, keep them on different media and don;t keep them all in one place.

I’d add one further tip, which is to check from time to time that you can actually read your backups – you’d be amazed how often a crisis occurs and its only then that people discover the backup wasn’t working properly.

Archaeo-Pad will nag you make a backup, the default setting is every 2 days, if you want to live dangerously settingswill take to the Preferences page where you can extend the interval.

I’d recommend leaving the setting alone and sending a backup to yourself by email at least once a day, just make it the last thing you do before cleaning off your trowel! And make a separate copy to the cloud or to a hard drive as well.